Best Entry Level Management Jobs

Best Entry Level Management Jobs

The positions listed below are considered entry-level in the field of management and all require at least a high school diploma. Though post-secondary education and some licensing or certification are sometimes required, these positions can often be obtained through several years of related work experience. Individuals in these positions frequently supervise the work of others, necessitating not only leadership skills but also strong communication, interpersonal, listening, and problem-solving abilities while working alongside employees, assigning tasks, and navigating any issues.

Food Service Managers

Food service managers manage the business in restaurants, hotels, school cafeterias, and other establishments that prepare and serve food and beverages to ensure profitability as well as customer satisfaction in their dining experience. This typically entails ensuring that customers are served properly and in a timely manner, as well as intervening to address any complaints about food quality or service.

Food Service Managers

Establishments must meet health and food safety standards as well as sanitary regulations, so managers inspect supplies, equipment, and work areas on a regular basis, as well as employee food handling and preparation. They occasionally supervise orders and kitchen staff, occasionally collaborating with the chef to resolve any service delays.

In addition to meal preparation and customer satisfaction, food service managers must hire, train, supervise, appraise, discipline, and, if necessary, fire employees. They are in charge of assigning duties and scheduling work hours to ensure that there is always enough staff on hand to cover each shift, though they may also serve customers, process payments, or clean tables during busy times. Managers typically prepare payroll, manage employee records, and review or complete paperwork for taxes and wages, licensing, unemployment compensation, and other business records.

Median Pay: $58,670
Degree-Needed: High School Diploma
Projected Growth: 10%

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Agricultural Managers

Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers oversee and manage the production of crops, livestock, and dairy products by various establishments. Their responsibilities include overseeing all aspects of crop production and range management, such as planting, fertilizing, harvesting, and herding. When deciding which livestock and crops to raise and produce, they take into account a variety of factors such as soil conditions, disease, market conditions, and the availability of federal programs.

They also keep an eye on the changing prices of their products and employ strategies such as crop planning to protect themselves from any unforeseeable changes in the markets. Other responsibilities include keeping financial, employee, tax, and production records, as well as properly maintaining facilities and equipment. The majority of product is sold through food-processing companies, but farmers may choose to sell directly to consumers through farmers markets and cooperatives.

Agricultural Managers

Farmers and ranchers typically own and operate their own farms, though they may occasionally operate a working farm on land leased from a landowner. Farmers and ranchers usually do the majority, if not all, of the work on a smaller farm, whereas those who run larger farms usually have employees who help with physical labor, as well as truck driving, sales, and bookkeeping.

Agricultural managers, on the other hand, oversee day-to-day operations for corporations, farmers, and owners who do not live or work on their farms, ranches, timber tracts, or other agricultural establishments. They typically hire and supervise a variety of farm and livestock workers, set budgets, and make crop storage, transportation, and sales decisions. Workers in both of these fields may specialize in plant growth, animal care, aquatic life, and even landscaping plants.

Median Pay: $69,620
Degree-Needed: High School Diploma
Projected Growth: -1%

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Lodging Managers

Hotels, motels, and other lodging establishments are overseen by lodging managers who ensure that they run smoothly and profitably while also providing a pleasant experience for guests on vacation or business travel. Their responsibilities vary depending on the size of the establishment they manage and the amenities available, but they typically inspect facilities for cleanliness and appearance, ensure standards are met, answer guests’ questions, coordinate front-office activities, keep track of the establishment’s money, and set room rates and budgets.

They are also in charge of interviewing, hiring, training, and, if necessary, firing employees. They may even use social media as an online marketing tool at times.

Lodging Managers

General managers oversee all lodging operations at a property or, if working at a larger establishment, coordinate the activities of separate departments such as housekeeping, marketing and sales, security, and maintenance. Revenue managers are also in charge of accounting and cash flow, as well as monitoring room sales and reservations and other financial management tasks.

Front-office managers at hotels train and direct front-desk staff and coordinate reservations and room assignments. Convention service managers oversee the work of several departments to accommodate the needs of meetings, conventions, and special events at convention centers and other similar establishments.

Median Pay: $51,800
Degree-Needed: High School Diploma
Projected Growth: 4%

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Real Estate, Property and Community Association Managers

Property, real estate, and community association managers ensure that residential, commercial, or industrial properties are well-maintained, look nice, run smoothly, and retain their resale value. They are usually hired by owners of homes, apartments, office buildings, retail or industrial properties who are unable to oversee the day-to-day management of their real estate properties. They are either directly employed by the owner or indirectly through a contract with a property management firm.

Lodging Managers

Their duties frequently include meeting prospective renters and showing them properties, collecting monthly fees from tenants and individual owners, inspecting building facilities and grounds, contracting for trash removal and other services, investigating and resolving complaints and violations, keeping rental activity records, and much more. They must also follow anti-discrimination laws when renting or advertising in their jobs.

Also Read: Tips For First-Time Landlords

There are numerous types of management in this field, each with its own set of specialties and responsibilities. Property and rental managers, for example, oversee operations at income-generating commercial or residential properties, handling financial operations and ensuring investments generate the expected revenue. Community association managers oversee the maintenance of communal property and services in condominiums, cooperatives, and planned communities, as well as managing daily affairs and other duties similar to property managers.

Day-to-day operations at a single apartment, such as an apartment or office building, are overseen by onsite property managers. Real-estate asset managers, on the other hand, work for businesses and investors, planning and directing the purchase, sale, and development of real-estate properties on their behalf.

Median Pay: $58,670
Degree-Needed: High School Diploma
Projected Growth: 10%

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